PNW Indigenous Language Programs

“There is no handbook on how to save your tribal language, so you figure it out.”
Darrell Robes Kipp
Piegan Institute Founder

Last week during Indigenous Peoples’ Day, Duolingo revealed two new language programs, Navajo and Hawaiian.

The revitalization of Indigenous languages has continuously been a struggle for many Tribes around the US and beyond.

We wanted to spotlight some of the efforts taking place within the PNW by PNW Tribes to keep their languages alive.

 University of Saskatchewan - The Certificate in Indigenous Languages is perfect for educators who wish to be immersed in an Indigenous language while exploring Indigenous teaching methodologies.

University of Saskatchewan - The Certificate in Indigenous Languages is perfect for educators who wish to be immersed in an Indigenous language while exploring Indigenous teaching methodologies.

 Puyallup Tribe of Indians - Lushootseed is the language spoken by tribes living and around the Puget Sound region. Its borders extend to: Skagit Valley and Whidbey Island to the north; the east side of Kitsap Peninsula to the west; the drainage basin of South Puget Sound to the south; and the crest of the Cascade Mountains form Mt. Rainer to Mt. Baker to the north.

Puyallup Tribe of Indians - Lushootseed is the language spoken by tribes living and around the Puget Sound region. Its borders extend to: Skagit Valley and Whidbey Island to the north; the east side of Kitsap Peninsula to the west; the drainage basin of South Puget Sound to the south; and the crest of the Cascade Mountains form Mt. Rainer to Mt. Baker to the north.

 The Piikani Language Studies curriculum is designed to promote language proficiency in accordance with Piikani Language standards, which are equivalent to national standards for language acquisition.    Piikani even has an App in the Google Play Store

The Piikani Language Studies curriculum is designed to promote language proficiency in accordance with Piikani Language standards, which are equivalent to national standards for language acquisition.

Piikani even has an App in the Google Play Store

 The schools are all called Nizi PuhWah Sin meaning, “real speak” referring to the language of the people. To “real speak” means to speak the Blackfoot Language very well and poetically. People who “real speak” are known within the tribe and the language as Nizi ta piks, or “real people.”

The schools are all called Nizi PuhWah Sin meaning, “real speak” referring to the language of the people. To “real speak” means to speak the Blackfoot Language very well and poetically. People who “real speak” are known within the tribe and the language as Nizi ta piks, or “real people.”

  waq dal ?i gee ?ewksiknii ?elGank -  How do you say that in Klamath? This section is being presented to help keep alive and revitalize the Klamath Language, which like most other American Indian languages is quickly losing its fluent speakers. Presented primarily for tribal members, it is a basic course endorsed by the Culture and Heritage Department.

waq dal ?i gee ?ewksiknii ?elGank - How do you say that in Klamath? This section is being presented to help keep alive and revitalize the Klamath Language, which like most other American Indian languages is quickly losing its fluent speakers. Presented primarily for tribal members, it is a basic course endorsed by the Culture and Heritage Department.

 The First Peoples’ Cultural Council is excited to announce the relaunch of a beta (preview) version of FirstVoices.com, its ground-breaking online Indigenous language archiving and teaching resource.   Over the past two years, the FirstVoices website and back-end system have been significantly upgraded with input from over 50 community partners from across B.C. and feature improved navigation, easier data entry and faster access to language information and resources.

The First Peoples’ Cultural Council is excited to announce the relaunch of a beta (preview) version of FirstVoices.com, its ground-breaking online Indigenous language archiving and teaching resource.

Over the past two years, the FirstVoices website and back-end system have been significantly upgraded with input from over 50 community partners from across B.C. and feature improved navigation, easier data entry and faster access to language information and resources.

  Lushootseed  is the traditional language of the Suquamish People. Failed attempts to assimilate the Suquamish by the Federal Government in the 19th and 20th centuries resulted in the near loss of the language.  Family  Lushootseed  classes  are designed to incorporate learning for all ages and all levels language proficiency. The Suquamish Tribe operates the  Marion-Forsman Boushie Early Learning Center  and Chief Kitsap Academy (CKA). Language programs are incorporated into standard learning programs at both schools.

Lushootseed is the traditional language of the Suquamish People. Failed attempts to assimilate the Suquamish by the Federal Government in the 19th and 20th centuries resulted in the near loss of the language. Family Lushootseed classes are designed to incorporate learning for all ages and all levels language proficiency. The Suquamish Tribe operates the Marion-Forsman Boushie Early Learning Center and Chief Kitsap Academy (CKA). Language programs are incorporated into standard learning programs at both schools.

*All text and images are taken from their respective sites.